40 Pointe Cir Greenville, SC 29615

Introduction to Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea treatment

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts. If you snore loudly and feel tired even after a full night’s sleep, you might have sleep apnea.

The main types of sleep apnea are:

1-Obstructive sleep apnea, the more common form that occurs when throat muscles relax.

2-Central sleep apnea, which occurs when your brain doesn’t send proper signals to the muscles that control breathing. 3- Complex sleep apnea syndrome, also known as treatment-emergent central sleep apnea, which occurs when someone has both obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep-related breathing disorder that involves a decrease or complete halt in airflow despite an ongoing effort to breathe. It occurs when the muscles relax during sleep, causing soft tissue in the back of the throat to collapse and block the upper airway. This leads to partial reductions (hypopneas) and complete pauses (apneas) in breathing that last at least 10 seconds during sleep. Most pauses last between 10 and 30 seconds, but some may persist for one minute or longer. This can lead to abrupt reductions in blood oxygen saturation, with oxygen levels falling as much as 40 percent or more in severe cases.

The brain responds to the lack of oxygen by alerting the body, causing a brief arousal from sleep that restores normal breathing. This pattern can occur hundreds of times in one night. The result is a fragmented quality of sleep that often produces an excessive level of daytime sleepiness. Most people with OSA snore loudly and frequently, with periods of silence when airflow is reduced or blocked. They then make choking, snorting, or gasping sounds when their airway reopens. A common measurement of sleep apnea is the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). This is an average that represents the combined number of apneas and hypopneas that occur per hour of sleep.

US statistics show there is an epidemic of sleep apnea(SA) and disordered breathing today. 100 million Americans snore. 30% of the US population demonstrates disordered breathing.

It has been estimated that 20 million Americans suffer from moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and at least one person in five (65 million Americans) has mild OSA. The current medical healthcare system is failing to recognize and diagnose these problems.

The rate of motor vehicle accidents is seven times higher in patients with sleep apnea than in the average population.

This paves the way for a new age of dentistry "Integrative Dental Sleep Medicine"

  • Loud snoring
  • Episodes in which you stop breathing during sleep — which would be reported by another person
  • Gasping for air during sleep
  • Awakening with a dry mouth
  • Morning headache
  • Difficulty staying asleep (insomnia)
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness (hypersomnia)
  • Difficulty paying attention while awake
  • Irritability
  • Libido loss
  • Weight gain (from increased insulin resistance and glucose tolerance)
  • High blood pressure
  • Reflux
  • Increased risk of being involved in a deadly motor vehicle accident
  • Increased risk of stroke
  • Sudden death
  • Heart attack
  • ADHD
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Depression
  • Mood changes
  • Disturbed sleep of bed partner
  • Excess weight. Obesity greatly increases the risk of sleep apnea. Fat deposits around your upper airway can obstruct your breathing.
  • Neck circumference. People with thicker necks might have narrower airways.
  • A narrowed airway. You might have inherited a narrow throat. Tonsils or adenoids also can enlarge and block the airway, particularly in children.
  • Being male. Men are two to three times more likely to have sleep apnea than are women. However, women increase their risk if they're overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Being older. Sleep apnea occurs significantly more often in older adults.
  • Family history. Having family members with sleep apnea might increase your risk.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat, which can worsen obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who've never smoked. Smoking can increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether from an anatomical problem or allergies — you're more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Medical conditions. Congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and Parkinson's disease are some of the conditions that may increase the risk of obstructive sleep apnea. Polycystic ovary syndrome, hormonal disorders, prior stroke and chronic lung diseases such as asthma also can increase risk.

Snoring is a sound that has been compared to thunder. It occurs during sleep when the soft tissue located in the back of your mouth and airway vibrates during breathing.In men snoring is more common, however it does occur in woman also.

RISK FACTORS:

  • OBESITY
  • POST MENOPAUSE
  • NASAL OBSTRUCTION (DEVIATED SEPTUM)
  • SMOKING
  • ALCOHOL

Snoring tends to be the most disturbing to your bed partner. Loud snoring can also awake the person who snores. Loud and frequent snoring is a common sign of obstructive sleep apnea. If you are looking for a qualified top snoring dentist you have come to the right place. Dental Sleep Medicine of Greenville is dedicated to helping you get a sound night of sleep.

The following conditions can affect the airway and cause snoring:

Your mouth anatomy: Having a low, thick soft palate can narrow your airway. People who are overweight may have extra tissue in the back of their throat that may narrow the airway. Additionally, if the uvula is elongated, airflow can be obstructed and vibration may increase.

Alcohol consumption: Consuming alcohol before bedtime can also cause snoring. Alcohol relaxes the throat muscles and decreases the body’s natural defense against airway obstruction.

Nasal problems: Chronic nasal congestion or a deviated septum may contribute to your snoring.

Sleep apnea: Snoring also may be associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This is a serious condition in which your throat tissues partially or completely block your airway, preventing you from breathing during sleep. Oral appliance therapy can help to mitigate the effects of snoring or sleep apnea.

TMJ-TMD

There is a definitive correlation between sleep apnea and temporomandibular disorders and effects on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). When a person with obstructive apnea has many cease breathing episodes, the body's fight or flight survival response kicks in to get air. For this to happen, the brain releases epinephrine and orders the muscles of mastication to contract. This action causes the lower jaw to open up and move forward, allowing air to get in. However, the forces of this bruxism movement at the expense of the muscles cause violently stretching. The person involved then seeks out a TMJ Expert. As we established early on, 80% of the population with sleep apnea go about their way undiagnosed. Therefore, 1 in 5 adults has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It is my opinion that this should be considered a national emergency.

 

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep-related breathing disorder that involves a decrease or complete halt in airflow despite an ongoing effort to breathe. It occurs when the muscles relax during sleep, causing soft tissue in the back of the throat to collapse and block the upper airway. This leads to partial reductions (hypopneas) and complete pauses (apneas) in breathing that last at least 10 seconds during sleep. Most pauses last between 10 and 30 seconds, but some may persist for one minute or longer. This can lead to abrupt reductions in blood oxygen saturation, with oxygen levels falling as much as 40 percent or more in severe cases.

The brain responds to the lack of oxygen by alerting the body, causing a brief arousal from sleep that restores normal breathing. This pattern can occur hundreds of times in one night. The result is a fragmented quality of sleep that often produces an excessive level of daytime sleepiness. Most people with OSA snore loudly and frequently, with periods of silence when airflow is reduced or blocked. They then make choking, snorting, or gasping sounds when their airway reopens. A common measurement of sleep apnea is the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). This is an average that represents the combined number of apneas and hypopneas that occur per hour of sleep.

US statistics show there is an epidemic of sleep apnea(SA) and disordered breathing today. 100 million Americans snore. 30% of the US population demonstrates disordered breathing.

It has been estimated that 20 million Americans suffer from moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and at least one person in five (65 million Americans) has mild OSA. The current medical healthcare system is failing to recognize and diagnose these problems.

The rate of motor vehicle accidents is seven times higher in patients with sleep apnea than in the average population.

This paves the way for a new age of dentistry "Integrative Dental Sleep Medicine"

  • Loud snoring
  • Episodes in which you stop breathing during sleep — which would be reported by another person
  • Gasping for air during sleep
  • Awakening with a dry mouth
  • Morning headache
  • Difficulty staying asleep (insomnia)
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness (hypersomnia)
  • Difficulty paying attention while awake
  • Irritability
  • Libido loss
  • Weight gain (from increased insulin resistance and glucose tolerance)
  • High blood pressure
  • Reflux
  • Increased risk of being involved in a deadly motor vehicle accident
  • Increased risk of stroke
  • Sudden death
  • Heart attack
  • ADHD
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Depression
  • Mood changes
  • Disturbed sleep of bed partner
  • Excess weight. Obesity greatly increases the risk of sleep apnea. Fat deposits around your upper airway can obstruct your breathing.
  • Neck circumference. People with thicker necks might have narrower airways.
  • A narrowed airway. You might have inherited a narrow throat. Tonsils or adenoids also can enlarge and block the airway, particularly in children.
  • Being male. Men are two to three times more likely to have sleep apnea than are women. However, women increase their risk if they're overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Being older. Sleep apnea occurs significantly more often in older adults.
  • Family history. Having family members with sleep apnea might increase your risk.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat, which can worsen obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who've never smoked. Smoking can increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether from an anatomical problem or allergies — you're more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Medical conditions. Congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and Parkinson's disease are some of the conditions that may increase the risk of obstructive sleep apnea. Polycystic ovary syndrome, hormonal disorders, prior stroke and chronic lung diseases such as asthma also can increase risk.

DO YOU SNORE?

We can help! Click here for a complimentary online sleep health evaluation.